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Full text of "Train's speeches in England, on slavery & emancipation. Delivered in London, on March 12th, and 19th, 1862. Also his great speech on the "pardoning of traitors.""

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RAIN'S SPEECHES ON SLAVERY, EMANCIPATION, AND PARDONING OF TRAITORS., , 



) TIIOKIZI<;» AttF.KICAiV 1C1HTIOY. 





AT SPEECHES 



z 
Z 



IN ENGLAND ON 



SLAVERY AND EMANCIPATION, 

DELIVERED IN LONDON, ON MARCH 12TII AND 13TII, 1SG2. 
ALSO, HIS GREAT SPEECH ON THE 

"PARDONING OF TRAITOES." 



BY 



GEORGE FRANCIS TRAIN, 

OF BOSTON, UNITED STATES. 

AUTHOR OF TRAIN'S UNION SPEECHES, DELIVERED IN ENGLAND DURING THE 
PRESENT AMERICAN WAR, ON THE SIDE AND WELFARE OF THE AMERI- 
CAN UNION. PUBLISHED BY T. B. PETERSON & BROTHERS, 
PHILADELPHIA, IN ONE LARGE OCTAVO VOLUME. 
PRICE TWENTY-FIVE CENTS A COPY. 



QUESTIONS UNDER DISCUSSION. 

"IS AMERICAN SLAVERY TO THE NEGRO A STEPPING STONE FROM AFRICAN 

BARBARISM TO CHRISTIAN CIVILIZATION," AND "WOULD CIVILIZATION 

BE ADVANCED BY THE SOUTH GAINING THEIR INDEPENDENCE." 



T. B. 



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n o^ ' ._. ■■,-■■- „ — . _^)QA 



TRAIN'S SPEECHE 



IN ENGLAND, ON 



SLAVERY & EMANCIPATION. 

DELIVERED IN LONDON, ON MARCH 12th, and 19th, 1SG2. 



ALSO HIS GREAT SPEECH ON THE 



"PARDONING OF TRAITORS. 



J5 



BY 

GEORGE FRANCIS TRAIN. 

AUTHOR OF "TRAIN'S UNION SPEECHES, DELIVERED IN ENGLAND DURTNG THE 

PRESENT AMERICAN WAR, ON THE SIDE AND WELFARE OF THE AMERICAN 

UNION." PUBLISHED BY T. B. PETERSON & BROTHERS, 

PHILADELPHIA, IN ONE LARGE OCTAVO VOLUME, 

PRICE TWENTY-FIVE CENTS A COPY. 



QUESTIONS UNDER DISCUSSION: 
IS AMERICAN SLAVERY TO THE NEGRO A STEPPING-STONE FROM AFRICAN 
BARBARISM TO CHRISTIAN CIVILIZATION?" AND "WOULD CIVILIZATION 
BE ADVANCED BY THE SOUTH GAINING THEIR INDEPENDENCE?" 



fllihbclijljnt: 

T. B. PETERSON & BROTHERS, No. 306 CHESTNUT STREET. 
PRICE TE3ST CEISTTS. 



E 4S5 



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1S62, by 

T. B. PETERSON & BROTHERS, 

In the Clerk's Office of the District Court, in and for the Eastern District of 

Pennsylvania. 












GEORGE FRANCIS TRAIN 



ON 



SLAVERY AND UNIVERSAL EMANCIPATION. 



"IS AMERICAN SLAVERY TO THE NEGRO A STEPPING-STONE 
FROM AFRICAN BARBARISM TO CHRISTIAN CIVILIZATION V 

[From the London American of March 19, 18C2.] 

stronger than its neighbor — the rainbow 
more beautiful than the storm-cloud — the 
lily more lovely than the lilac ; when you 
will tell me the reason that Providence or- 
dained that the fair Saxon should be per- 
mitted to express, in the blush upon her 
face, all the emotions of her soul, while the 
African knows not the signification of the 
word— (applause)— when these things are 
made clear to me, I will tell you how and 
why He has made the African the servant 
of the Anglo-Saxon race, but not till then. 
(Cheers.) They were born and bred ser- 
vants, they cannot be masters. I have been 
in Africa, and nowhere did I learn that the 
Nubian had ever been other than a hewer of 
wood and a drawer of water. For forty 
centuries they have borne the burden. We 
may regret their position, but we cannot 
change the laws of God. The obelisks and 
hieroglyphics of the past have stamped their 
occupations. Africa is a desert — America a 
garden — mind you, I speak of that portion of 
the great Ethiopean country that cultivates 
the English staple of shivery. (" Oh ! it is not 
a modern institution.") No, I admit that 
slavery is no new institution — did I not 
open the debate with that statement ? It is 
as old as the world of the geologists. All 
ages have owned their slaves. Examine 
the archives of time. Chaos before Cosmo 
— then the lower animals, then man, concen- 
trating something from all, but created in 
the image of his Creator. Man required 
society. " Society must have laws. Laws 
constitute government. Hence, government 
is civil law, controlling property, liberty, life. 
This was the primitive state. The people 



Mr. Train. — Slavery, Mr. Chairman and 
Gentlemen, is as old as the Bible — older, for 
man existed before parchment, and owned 
slaves, before he commenced writing for the 
Times, — in which he lived. (Laughter.) You 
all know why I put the question on the 
paper — wherever the American war has been 
discussed, each speaker seems to have felt 
it his duty to give the Americans a homily 
on slavery. Hence, it occurred to me that 
a subject which had occupied your Broug- 
hams — your Wilberforces, your Buxtons, 
your Clarksons— for more than a quarter of 
a century, was wide enough for a Forum de- 
bate without the collateral issues which 
stifles sound logic and swamps honest argu- 
ment. (Applause.) It was generous in me 
to take the unpopular side, and, perhaps, 
too bold to rashly throw the gauntlet to the 
clever men that have come in to-night to 
crush me with abolitionism. (Laughter and 
applause.) But fear not for me, I will make 
good my cause and oblige you to admit that 
American slavery is a stepping-stone to tlte 
negro from African barbarism to Christian 
civilization ! Hence, a Divine Institution. 
(" Oh," and dissent.) Gentlemen, you mur- 
mur, but you have no right to trifle with the 
mysterious ways of Providence. Whatever 
is, is right ; man proposes. God disposes. 
He arranged the plan of civilization I defend, 
not man. 

When you will explain why, in His wis- 
dom, He made one mountain overtop an- 
other mountain — formed one ocean larger 
than another ocean. — planned one valley 
wider than another valley ; when you can 
make me understand why lie made the oak 



20 



train's speeches on slavery and emancipation. 



elect governors; the most intellectual are 
chiefs. First, it was physical courage, then 
mental energy, superiority ; hence slavery. 
You find it in every age. From Chaldea it 
went to Egypt, to Arabia, to all Eastern 
lands, and finally all over the world. I 
found them everywhere in my travels, but 
under different names. In Homer's day all 
war prisoners in Greece were slaves. The 
Lacedemonian youth were trained to trap 
them, and afterwards butcher them. Three 
thousand prisoners were slaughtered on one 
occasion by these manly Spartans merely 
for amusement. Three centuries before the 
Christian era, Alexander destroyed Thebes, 
and sold into abject slavery, the entire popu- 
lation. Slaves in chains, received the ban- 
quet guests in the Roman mansions. The 
laws of the XII Tables made insolvent 
debtors slaves until the debt was paid ; and 
only forty-two years before Christ, Polio fat- 
tened his lampreys on the slaves that of- 
fended him ! Twelve years before that 
Ccecilius Isidorus left 4,116 in his will to his 
heir. Twenty-two centuries, (says Dr. Mor- 
ton,) before Christ, we see in the monuments 
of Egypt, Caucasian and negro as master 
and slave. Gliddon's " Types of Man," 
pictures the negro dancing in handcuffs in 
the streets of Thebes three thousand four 
hundred years ago ! The negro is always 
painted a slave on the vases found in the 
tombs of Etruria. He has not made in 
Africa one progressive step, since his char- 
acteristics were shown on the gravestones of 
the kings. I make these preparatory com- 
ments in reply to the gentleman who said it 
was not purely an English institution, in 
order to bring my points to bear upon the 
question, so as to prove to your satisfaction 
that American slavery is a stepping-stone to 
the improvement of the African. 

England had the best of examples for in- 
troducing slavery into the Western World. 
(Hear.) But let us not trust to profane 
historians — take sacred writers. Read the 
Bible and observe the bondsmen — the laws 
that regulate their sale and purchase. No- 
tice the numbers owned by Abraham, by 
Isaac, by Jaco~b. Moses, too, had so many, 
he made laws to govern the slave-owner. 
"What were the bondsmen andjbondsmaids 
of the ancients but slaves ? Dr. Wayland 
says that the Hebrews held slaves since the 
conquest of Canaan — and it was on Canaan 
that the badge of servitude fell. Abraham 
owned one thousand. Even Whitfield did 
not call it a sin. Read 25th Leviticus — 
read 21st Exodus — where the slave is called 
money — " When his master shall bore his 
ear through with an awl, and he shall own 
him for ever." Polygamy, divorce, murder, 
incest, the Bible precepts forbade, but 
placed no ban on slavery I find no law 
against it in the Scriptures. Even Moses 



delivered up a fugitive slave — (hear, hear) — 
but it does not follow that I advocate it in 
perpetuity. (Continued applause.) The 
fact is, men in our day would be hung for 
what then hardly occasioned a rebuke. 
"Servants obey your masters," was the Di- 
vine law, and St. Paul endorsed it. If the 
Author of Christianity had not approved of 
it, His goodness and his honor must neces- 
sarily have rejected it. The Old Testament 
sanctioned it, the New gives no word nor 
sign against it — but laws regulating it are 
recorded in both. St. Paul had time to give 
directions about the cut of a coat, or to say 
polite words to King Agrippa, but nowhere 
records anything against slavery: on the 
contrary, in his letter to his friend Philemon, 
to whom he consigns his own son Onesimus 
— " Whom I have begotten in my bonds." 
Does he not say " which in time past was to 
thee unprofitable, but now profitable to thee 
and me?" One would suppose that slavery 
is purely of American origin, if trained by 
the modern philanthropists, but it seems to 
be a plant of very ancient growth. But 
pass by the barbarous days, come back to 
Christian England. Saxon Alfred made 
laws as to the sale of slaves, and it is well 
known that in Saxon and Norman times the 
children of the English peasantry were sold 
in the Bristol market like cattle for expor- 
tation ! — some went to Ireland, some to 
Scotland. Wat Tyler's rebellion in 1381 
arose from serfdom. Edward VI. branded 
V on the breast of any one who lived idle 
for three days, and the buyer owned him for 
two years as his slave. He could oblige 
him to work by beating and chaining him ; 
let him absent himself for a fortnight, and, 
with a brand upon his cheek, he was made a 
slave for ever! His neck, his leg, or his 
arm could be circled with rings of iron, and 
these were Saxon England's laws ! Even in 
1547 a runaway apprentice became by 
statute a slave. This hasty glance at the 
past brings us down to the base of our ar- 
gument, when England stamped African 
slavery into the American soil. Sir John 
Hawkins (1563) was not long in following 
the Portuguese in profiting by the Congo 
and Angola traffic in Africans — perhaps 
England, even at this early day, thought of 
this method of Christianizing Africans. 
(Laughter, and " Good.") Queen Elizabeth 
was an accomplice, and the English Anne 
was joint partner with the Spanish Philip in 
dividing profit in the 144,000 slaves stipu- 
lated for in the Assiente treaty ! England, 
I say, may thus early have had the praise- 
worthy idea of civilizing this God-forsaken 
race by firmly planting in the West the 
Bible staple of slavery. (Laughter.) Eng- 
land has been consistent from the first — all 
the Georges were engaged in it. The dia- 
monds in the Royal Crown, now worn by 



TRAIN S SPEECHES ON SLAVERY AMD EMANCIPATION. 



21 



your Queen, were bought by the proceeds 
arising from the sale of your negroes, and as 
your former Queens, your Government and 
your people were all so largely engaged in 
the traffic, it is most unfair to presume that 
they had any other motive in view in carry- 
ing on this wholesale trade in human flesh 
than the Christianizing of the savage ! 
(Laughter.) Even the capital in which you 
established the East India Company and the 
Bank of England, was furnished from the 
profits of the African slave trade. 

Any one at all acquainted with English 
characteristics — knowing how disinterested 
they are in all matters of personal interest, 
and how little they care for that which most 
nations seek for — money — and how all their 
efforts for a period of centuries has been to 
benefit other lands instead of their own — 
(laughter) — will not for a moment credit the 
unpleasant rumors that have got abroad that 
England had any sordid object in view. 
(Laughter, and hear, hear.) Assuming, then, 
the generous view, that the civilization of 
the African was the object, I proceed to 
condense my whole argument into a few 
paragraphs to show how successful England 
has been in her philanthropy, and during 
the next five minutes, will convince the most 
skeptical, that American slavery to the 
negro is a stepping stone in the right direc- 
tion. In order to bring my point straight 
home to your comprehension, I shall lay be- 
fore you bone by bone, the skeleton on 
which I base the argument. I shall ana- 
lyze and divide the whole question into affir- 
matives and negatives, and making you ac- 
knowledge individual points, 1 shall compel 
you to admit the collective argument. — 
("We'll see !" and applause.) 
PHYSICALLY. 
Is not the meagre, thin, long, chop-fallen, 
half-starved savage, as you find him a pri- 
soner of war in negro land, a barbarian, com- 
pared to the happy, contented, well developed, 
strong, hearty, well clothed, well fed, negro 
slave in his Christianized state of American 
Slavery f Answer me, gentlemen — yes, or 
no, as I give you point by point. (" Yes," 
and applause.) That much admitted, take 
him intellectually and mentally. The 
physical effects, the intellectual — take care 
of the body, and you improve the mind. The 
muscles of your brain grow by action, as the 
muscles of the body become stronger by 
exertion. (" That's so,") A man's arm is 
like a woman's before he trains for the prize- 
fight ; but action makes the cords appear 
like iron ; so it is with the mind, hence the 
emaciated physique gives perforce an emaci- 
ated intellect. I ask you to look on the 
miserable, weak-minded animal in Africa, 
who knows not the sweets of labor, or Bible 
schools, Bible societies, or Christian prea- 
chers — makes no statues, paints no portraits, 



writes no books, and contrast him in his 
improved state in Hie West, where he has a 
higher order of talent to shape his thoughts; 
— look at moles, and your ideas become 
moley ; look at mountains, and they become 
mountainous. In Africa, he had no higher 
example. In America, the Caucasian race 
has elevated his intellect, as it has improved 
his physique, and I ask again, has not the 
barbarian, which you admit in the one case, 
made progress in the other? ("Yes," and 
applause.) 

COMMERCIALLY. 

The African savage never benefitted man- 
kind as an. African savage (for their palm 
oil, their elephants' tusks, and traffic in 
human flesh is the commerce of the white 
man ;) but as an American slave has he not 
grown corn, cotton, sugar, rice, tobacco, and 
coffee, and thus helped to civilize the world 
more than all the missionaries in Christen- 
dom? ("Yes." and applause.) 
FINANCIALLY. 

The argument applies — what finance has 
he in Africa? No circulating medium, no 
exchequer bills, no currency, nothing but 
human beings constitute the coin in their 
barter trade ; while iu America, does not 
his labor, based on the commerce it produces, 
regulate exchanges, rule markets, stimulate 
finance ? Is not the Atlantic Ocean bridg- 
ed with letters of credit? — perhaps not now, 
since our blockades is so effectual — (laugh- 
ter) — proving that the African financially 
stands in a higher position as an American 
slave than as a negro barbarian! ("Yes," 
and applause.) 

MECHANICALLY. 

What arts, sciences, instruments ; what 
ingenuity has the negro in his barbarian 
state ever shown ? Nothing ; but in our 
American slavery, he has seen in the white 
man a higher order of mankind ; and there 
are now mechanics, carpenters, smiths, metal 
workers among slaves. Will any gentleman 
dispute it ? (No.) Am I stating facts ? 
(Yes.) '1 hen gentlemen, take care, or I shall 
make you admit the entire argument, piece 
by piece, before I come to the climatrix. — 
(Laughter.) 

SOCIALLY. 

I see gentlemen, what yon are all waiting 
for — you all expect me to be floored upon 
the moral, social and religious point of view. 
You have admitted my former propositions, 
believing that I should break down upon the 
moral view of the subject, forgetting, as you 
do, that all the previous points which I have 
made in the affirmative — physically, intel- 
lectually, COMMERCIALLY, MECHANICALLY 

(and I could have added agriculture and 
manufactures) — bear direct on the social, 
religious, and moral aspect of the case. But 
I do not require their assistance, although 
each one of them proves the affirmative of 



22 



TRAIN S SPEECHES ON SLAVERY AND EMANCIPATION. 



the question under discussion. I now take 
it up socially. The African Las no social 
ties, no sacred rights, no family pleasures, 
and is a cannibal; while as an American 
slave he goes to church, sings psalms, laughs, 
reads tracts, shoots birds, dances round the 
plantation tires, and is the happiest laborer 
I have ever witnessed in my extensive 
travel. — (Cheers, and " That's so" from the 
Southerners.) Will you admit that, as the 
American slave never eats his own or other, 
people's childi'en, that American slavery is 
Christianity contrasted with the barbarism 
of cannibalism? (Applause, "yes," and 
" no," from two voices.) The Hon. Colonial 
Secretary from Sierra Leone says no ; then 
I will give him an opportunity of proving the 
negative ; but I have with me a higher au- 
thority that says yes. Although perhaps, 
not strictly parliamentary, will you allow me 
to read a letter received from one of the 
most distinguished men of this century with 
whom I have been corresponding, which 
admits what the gentlemen from the African 
coast denies. The letter, gentlemen, is from 
the distinguished poet and abolitionist, M. 
Victor Hugo. You may remember his 
celebrated picture on the John Brown raid 
— simply a black fore-ground, with a man 
hanging in the distance, while the light of 
abolition is breaking in the sky beyond ! 
Victor Hugo wrote a letter to the engraver, 
commemorating the act as the dissolution of 
the American Empire. On this I wrote him, 
proposing to prove to him, as I shall do to 
you before I get through, that Mr. Seward's 
prophetic Irrepressible Conflict, as inaug- 
urated by the John Brown raid (in which 
Mr. Seward was in no ivay implicated.) that 
so far from destroying our republic it would 
give it a lease for another hundred years. 
(Cries of " Read, read.") I will translate it 
into English. 

" Your opinion, sir, is true upon the first 
phase of slavery, but it is not all so in the 
second. It is evident that slavery wrested 
its prey from the eaters of human flesh, but 
it has only progressed in regard to cannibal- 
ism ; whenever it finds itself in the presence of 
Christianism, and, above all, of human reason, 
it must abdicate under penalty of becoming 
monstrous. — The persistency of the South- 
ern States in slavery is the greatest moral 
deformity of the nineteenth century. (Ap- 
plause.) You see, sir, that we differ in our 
points of view. However I am not for that 
less sensible to the sentiment of sympathy 
expressed in your honorable letter in such 
warm words, and I pray you to accept the 
assurance of my esteem. 

(Signed) "Victor Hugo. 

"Hauteville House, Feb. 25, 1861." 

In reply, I argued with him as with you, 
by saying, as he admits the first phase of my 



proposition, a system that rescues humanity 
from man-eaters must have some divinity 
in its origin — Religiously and morally, all 
the heads under which I have classified the 
arguments are subordinate to this — the bar- 
barian meets civilized man and improves as 
far as he can. Education may develop, but 
cannot originate mind. Color is not the 
only thing that marks him. You must first 
put inside his thick skull nine cubic inches 
more of brain! He may possess the two 
hundred and forty-eight bones, the four hun- 
dred muscles, the fifty-six joints on hands 
and feet, the twenty miles of arteries that 
make the white man — and those who ap- 
proach them in summer will testify that 
they also have the seven millions of pores 
(laughter) ; but the brain, the organ of 
thought is not there ; for the negro, while a 
man in body, is in mind a child. 

Three types of man landed in the Ameri- 
can forests, and are well represented by 
three classes of the horse tribe — the Indian 
was the Zebra, you could never tame him; the 
white man teas the Arab horse, the living pic- 
ture of strength and progress (hear, hear) ; 
the negro was the donkey (laughter), who did 
the labor, and in that way carried out his 
destiny. 

All men are not born "free and equal." 
I deny it. The Creator's plans cannot be 
thwarted by a turn of words in the nation's 
declaration of independence. Jefferson may 
have intended to say that all white men were 
born free and equal ; but if he did so he was 
wrong, because they are not. All are differ- 
ent — no two things are alike — no drop in 
the ocean, leaf in forest, sand in mountain, 
fish in sea, flower in garden. How, then, 
can races be the same ? Each land has its 
fauna, its flora, and its humanity. This has 
been so in all ages. The Arab, the Egyptian, 
the Negro, are as distinctly chiseled in the 
monuments forty centuries ago as are the 
wild dug, the greyhound, and the turnspit. 
The type never dies! (Applause.) Geology 
shows the different strata of the earth ; 
ethnology teaches us the different strata of 
men — the negro is the Paleozoic. 

As there are no teachers, no schoolmasters, 
no mechanics' associations, no Christian 
ministers, nothing for the African to look up 
to in Africa, how expect improvement, 
morally or religiously, unless transplanted to 
another climate, where his eyes, his ears, 
and senses are taught, without much effort, 
the common rudiments of education. Con- 
centrate your thoughts on Lilliput, and 
your mind becomes Lilliputian ; but centre 
your gaze on Gulliver, and your views con- 
sequently become Gulliverian! (Applause.) 
My forty minutes are nearly exhausted, and 
I ask you to run along the edge of my argu- 
ment and tell me if I have not proved be- 
yond the shadow of a doubt that American 



TRAIN S SPEECHES ON SLAVERY AND EMANCIPATION. 



23 



slavery to the Negro is a stepping-stone from 
African barbarism to Christian civilization. 
(Loud cheers, and "No" from Mr. Edwards.) 
One gentleman says no, and yet all have 
admitted, as I put bone and bone together, 
and laid before you my plan, that, carrying 
as you have done any portion of the argu- 
ment in my favor, it naturally bears with it 
the whole ; and the collateral issues that I 
have raised were merely the veins, arteries, 
blood, and flesh, that I have filled into the 
framework ; and if I have occupied a few 
minutes more, it is in order to put boots, 
and trousers, and coat, and hat upon my 
Christianized African, and let him stand be- 
fore you an improved human being, with 
nine cubic inches less of brain than the Cau- 
casian race, that has assisted him up one 
stepping-stone towards the temple of Chris- 
tian freedom. (Cheers.) 

But Mr. Edwards said no ! I will then 
convince him, by firing another arrow in my 
quiver. Read the recent parliamentary cor- 
respondence of Dahomey, regarding the in- 
human acts of that barbarous people. King 
Gezo, not many months ago, died. In ac- 
cordance with their usual custom, the great 
king must have a great funeral. Seven 
thousand negroes were to be tortured, mu- 
tilated, and burned to ashes over the funeral 
pile of the dead king — but owing to the high 
price of slaves, arising from England's rav- 
enous demand for cotton — (cheers) — still, as 
you observe, at her old work of Christian- 
izing the Heathen — (laughter) — negroes 
commanded too high a price at Dahomey to 
permit the royal treasury to luxuriate in 
such gigantic torture, hence the successors 
of the dead king tore away from their fami- 
lies only eight hundred little children and 
old men, young girls, and aged women, and 
sacrified them with their instruments of tor- 
ture in honor of the dead chief, in accordance 
with the barbarous funeral rites of that un- 
happy land ! 

By purchasing slave-grown produce, Eng- 
land again did something for civilization in 
this case, as she did three centuries ago, 
when Sir John Hawkins landed his first 
cargo on the American shore. (Laughter 
and applause.) Now, as Mr. Edwards can- 
not give me a single instance where any 
American slave on the American plantation 
has been sacrificed over the funeral pile in a 
similar manner — or point to a single instance 
of Cannibalism, he certainly must now admit 
by this last shot in my locker, that a system 
which does away with this inhuman practice 
— that Lord Palmerston and Lord John 
Eussell have in vain tried to uproot in Africa 
— must be beneficial to the African barbar- 
ian, and gives me the affirmative of the ar- 
gument that The Negro is a stepping-stone 
from African barbarism to Christian civ- 
ilization. 



Several speakers were on their feet at 
once in reply — and each in his turn attacked 
Mr. Train in the stronghold he had built 
around his argument. He baffled his antag- 
onists by the way he put the question — they 
evidently looking at the debasement of the 
white man more than the elevation of the 
negro. So many were desirous of speaking, 
Mr. Train moved the adjournment of the 
debate to Monday evening, March 17th. 
This was carried, and on that evening the 
hall was packed — most of the speakers being 
against Mr. Train — who rose to order, and 
asked them not to argue on what he was 
going to say, but upon what he had said. 
He told them that he had paved one stepping- 
stone— and asked them how they were able 
to interpret his thoughts. " How do you 
know," said he, "but what the real stepping- 
stone is Universal Emancipation." 

CONCLUSION OF MR. TRAIN'S 
GREAT SPEECH ON SLAVERY. 

Mr. Train says America's mission is for 
white people — England's for blacks — hence 
recommends Lord Shaftesbury to give his 
attention to Africa — as a wider field for his 
well-known philanthropy. This speech will 
attract attention by the boldness of its 
theories — and the new light he has thrown 
upon some old ideas. As he has so often 
foreshadowed events during the Revolution, 
he may have again anticipated the policy of 
the Administration. 

Mr. Train, — Inasmuch, Mr. Chairman and 
geutleman, as this is the fifth night of the 
debate — and inasmuch as thirteen experi- 
enced debaters have been firing hot shot into 
the fortification I built around my argument 
— while only two speakers came to my 
assistance — and inasmuch as I adopted the 
unpopular side of the question to give life to 
the debate — the least I can expect is that 
you will yield to me the same fairness you 
have given to others — (hear, hear) — and not 
interrupt me unless under mis-statement — 
no matter how direct may be the fire of my 
batteries — until I have fully satisfied you 
that the point I took when opening the 
debate has not in any point been assailed. 
(Oh, and laughter.) I knew the result at the 
start — I knew the question was so worded 
that nothing could shake my position. — 
Hence, as no one has confuted my argument 
_(oh) — I have a right to demand the same 
latitude in reply that you have accorded to 
others — (hear) — and if I tread rather uncere- 



24 



TRAIN S SPEECHES ON SLAVERY AND EMANCIPATION. 



moniously on the prejudices of the English 
people — you should remember how severely 
I have been attacked. So fair play and no 
favor— (hear and applause) — and I will do 
my best to pay in gold the paper drafts 
which have been made upon me — and if I 
use the weapon of ridicule and satire, it is in 
order to spice the logic and reason with 
which I shall confound my enemies! (Hear, 
hear.) In my opening speech I met their 
figures of rhetoric with my figures of arith- 
metic, making all admit the stepping-stone, 
save those so blind that they would not see ! 
— That admitted, they wished me to go fur- 
ther, hence ripped up the whole question of 
the African slave-trade, West Indian eman- 
cipation, aud American slavery. — Proving 
my first step, to the satisfaction of every 
intelligent mind, it may come to pass, before 
I conclude, that I am more of an abolitionist 
than you are. ("Oh," and cries of "You 
have a queer way of showing it.") Does not 
the order of nature give sensation before 
thinking; — creeping before walking — crying 
before language — and coarseness before cul- 
ture — superstition before intellectual educa- 
tion — experience before wisdom — and barba- 
rism before civilization ? (Hear, hear.) So, 
American slavery precedes the emancipation 
of the African slave ? (Applause.) I kept 
my argument rattling against the bull's-eye 
of the question, while my opponents did nut 
hit the target at all — hence it is useless for 
me to bring any more facts to bear upon the 
stepping-stone, — but will take up one by one. 
as my memory serves me, the points of the 
other debaters, in order to show how ridicu- 
lous by a little analysis they can be made to 
appear. (No personalities !) The gentle- 
man says no personalities, and yet they have 
endeavored to hammer me into a gold leaf. 
— I did intend commencing at the alpha, 
walking along towards the omega — but as 
there are many new speakers here to-night, 
I will reverse the argument, walking back- 
ward snail-like, as some of the other speakers 
have done (laughter), by taking up the last 
debater. His great point was, that slavery 
was based on piracy, robbery, debauchery, 
and murder — hence it could have nothing to 
do with Christianity. 

Now, gentlemen, this is the platform on 
which the world was built. (Oh ! and dis- 
sent.) You dissent' — but here are a few 
thousand years of history crowded into one 
paragraph. — Cain murdered — Lot sotted — 
Onau onanized — David Uriahized — Moses 
plotted — and Jacob cheated — Solomon Mor- 
monized — Noah inebriated — Peter lied — 
Judas betrayed. — (Sensation.) — Yet, while 
all these bad men were slave owners — each 
representing a fair type of the Confederate 
Cabinet — none of them were so debauched 
in immorality as that cabinet have been by 
Negro slavery, as to have been guilty of the 



terrible crime of high treason against the 
grandest government the world ever saw ! 
(Loud cheers.) The gentleman gave such a 
picture of the African slave trade, showing 
the manacled position of the slave, that an 
ungenerous mind might have had the sus- 
picion — as he comes from that enterprising 
Nutmeg State of Connecticut — that he had 
commanded a slaver, (laughter, and hear, 
hear,) and the details he gave as to slave 
owners selling negro babies by the pound, 
might lead us to suppose that at some period 
of his life, he was also directly interested in 
the domestic slave trade as well. (Oh, and 
laughter.) He says, while holding high my 
country's flag during the reign of Secessia in 
England, he was one of the loudest to cheer 
me ; but he felt it to be a disgrace to be an 
American — to hear the" Union champion 
advocating negro slavery, (applause) ; and 
yet, before I finish, I shall prove myself 
more of au abolitionist than he is. (Hear, 
hear, and prove it.) His abolitionism, like 
Lord Shaftesbury's, is theoretical — mine 
may prove practical — he talks, I act. — My 
plan may benefit the slave by being honest, 
while Exeter Hall abolitionism is the basest 
kind of hypocrisy. (Oh, cheers, and dissent.) 
He says, a great statesman, whose superior- 
ity Mr. Train acknowledges — fell from the 
height hehad raised himself in New England, 
by selling himself to the slave owners, and 
he compliments me by galvanising me into 
so important a personage, that a storm of 
indignation would reach me from Boston, 
as greeted him there on his arrival from 
Washington. — Now, Mr. Chairman, first, 
I never acknowledged Mr. Webster my 
superior. (Loud cheers, laughter and ap- 
plause.) Second, My inherent modesty (re- 
newed laughter.) would not allow me to 
suppose — that my humble opinions would 
stimulate the American people into exhibit- 
ing any such feats of gymnastics as he has 
pictured. (Laughter.) They did give up a 
fugitive slave in my native city — aud by 
obeying the sacred mandate of the law 
under the Constitution — proved how little 
cause the conspirators had for the ungodly 
rebellion which agitated our land. (Cheers.) 
Several speakers plunged into the horrors 
of the middle passage as he had done. 
Admit, that England for three centuries has 
Macadamized the bed of the Atlantic Ocean 
with the skulls of the negro. (Oh !) Admit 
all these horrors that weigh heavy upon 
England's shoulders, but acknowledge that, 
had she allowed the same free trade in the 
emigration of the black man, that regulates 
other nices, how many millions of lives she 
might have saved in her praiseworthy efforts 
to Christianize the heathen. (Oh, aud 
cheers.) It was the squadron on the coast 
— the mistaken philanthropy, in making 
the negro emigration illegal, that caused the 



train's speeches on slavery and emancipation. 25 



horrors of the middle passage, while my plan 
would have been to have opened the way in 
comfortable ships like the Great Eastern — 
[cheers) — which would have carried out the 
Exeter Hall platform una more Christian 
basis— (oh! and applause)— but with my 
permission she shall not bring any more of 
them to America. (Laughter.) America's 
mission is to look out for white men, while 
England's mission is to Christianize the 
blacks. Why should England give all her 
attention to slavery as it exists in America? 
Why not talk with Portugal and the Em- 
peror of Brazil ? Why not send their aboli- 
tion speakers to Cuba instead of taking in 
that old slave catcher and slave trader — 
repudiating old Spain, whose Government 
stocks she refuses to quote on the London 
Stock Exchange— into a full partnership, 
into the An»lo-Gallic tillibustering firm re- 
cently established in the garden land of the 
Montezumas ! (Cheers.) How is it that 
England has no sympathies for her own col- 
liers, her own miners, and hard-worked 
operatives? (Oh!) How is it that Lord 
Shaftesbury and the Duchess of Sutherland 
have selected th's one race for their especial 
protection? No word of kindness for the 
white Circassian sold in the slave marts of 
old Stamboul ! No pity for the poor Beers 
in Southern Africa ! No thought of the 
red Indian she formerly sold on English 
soil — nor a word of pity for the dark native 
of Hindostan, she sent to wear his life away 
on the sugar plantations of the Mauritius. 
No sympathy for the yellow-faced sou of 
Confucius whom I have seen her kidnap in 
the China Seas, and bear him away under 
the philanthropic flag of England, through 
similar horrors of the middle passage, 
vividly described by the last speaker — to 
perish on the dry arid rocks of the Chincha 
Islands, where he digs the guano which is 
sold in England to cultivate the soil in order 
to give you food — (Cheers — or sells him 
under the Coolie system to the Spanish 
planter, where he ekes out a few years of 
miserable existence, and lays him down in a 
stranger grave, far away from the land of 
his ancestors, with this simple epitaph — 
worked to death through the Christian philan- 
thropy of Exder Hall. (Oh! and hear, 
hear.) 

I say, why is it, gentlemen, that England's 
sympathies are only for this Ethiope race? 
1 will tell you— simply because it was fashion- 
able—and one of my objects in bringing 
forward this question is to smash the Eexter 
Hall platform into so many pieces that its 
most enthusiastic disciples will never be able 
again to connect th m together. (Dissent.) 
Abolitionism in England, means the destruc- 
tion of the Western Empire! More hate, 
envy, jealousy against the white race, than 
sympathy, affection, or love for the black. 



(Oh ! and cheers.) Northerner as I am by 
birth and education, 1 have been so often 
insulted at the hospitable table of England 
in defending my country, my people, and my 
flag against the question oft lie negro, which 
was not a Northern institution, that it almost 
made a pro-slavery man ol me, as my nation- 
ality was sufficiently wide to cover all the 
institutions of my country. (Cheers.) In 
this. I agree with Webster. I know no 
North, no South, no East, no West,— when 
England abused America on account of an 
institution which she has planted there— her 
vituperations against my own laud were; too 
apparent not to be offensive — and living in 
England throughout the entire reign of Seees- 
sia,l saw her inconsistency by falling sudden- 
ly in love with the treacherous reptiles that 
raised their fabric of treason on the corner- 
stone platform of American slavery, and my 
annoyance culminated into disgust, when I 
saw Lord Shaftesbury refuse to attend a 
meeting of clergymen in that same Exeter 
Hall- a meeting of Christian preachers 
called together to offer up prayers to Al- 
mighty God for peace between England and 
America! (Hear, hear.) You see that 
when sixty millions of white people are to be 
saved, Lord Shaftesbury does not wish to 
embarrass the Government. (Shame.) Now 
you have the secret of why I put this question 
before you. It was to show the Dishonesty, 
the Humbug, the Cant, of the Exeter Hall 
disciples', who would involve sixty millions of 
respectable white people in war to gratify 
their selfish appetites for African charities. 
("Oh." and "hear, hear!") Better be an 
honest American slave than a dishonest 
Anti-Slavery freeman ! Servitude like 
happiness is only comparative — good is 
comparative,— so is evil, — so is light, heat, 
a i r> — all comparative. Liberty, when mis- 
taken for license — servility when mistaken 
for civility — is as bad as to place the servant 
in the master's chair. The creator made the 
world to suit himself— not Exeter Hall. — 
His tenants were of his own choosing. 
Having a taste for colors, as shown in the 
rainbow, the dolphia, the flower-garden, and 
the forest, he carried out his fancy in color, 
shape, and capacity of man. — (Applause ) — 
In nature large fish swallow little fish, — large 
trees draw the sap from little trees —large 
oceans drink up the rivulets, — so that race 
that possesses most governing power, rules. 
(Hear.) The negro never was Governor — 
Americau slaves sleep under the palm tree — 
quote scripture, and have fewer crimes than 
any other race, — as the churning ot milk 
maketh butter— as the ringing of the nose 
bringeth blood— so England's Abolition non- 
| sense was introduced on the Slave question 
i in order to bring contention among the 
| Americans. (Hear, hear, and applause.) 
To show how well they have succeeded, I 



26 



TRAIN S SPEECHES ON SLAVERY AND EMANCIPATION. 



point you to the present Civil War, where 
brother hews down brother with a blood- 
thirstiness that ought to satisfy the most 
rabid disciple of Exeter Hall. (Oh !) Leave 
America alone for awhile — Withdraw thy 
foot from thy neighbor's house, ye Abolition- 
ists — lest lie be weary of thee and so hate thee! 
— Let Lord Shaftesbury explain " the way 
of the eagle in the air — the way of a ser- 
pent on the rock— the way of a ship in the 
waters of the sea " — before he tries to raise 
the negro above the kitchen. Since Ham 
rejoiced at Noah's intoxication — since Judah 
dishonored his child— since Moses broke the 
Commandments on the mountain — the negro 
race has swept the house, made the fires, 
done the cooking, and always gone out to 
service. Tribulation worketh patience — 
patience maketh experience — experience 
bringeth hope. Hence, I believe, with Ed- 
ward Everett, "that American slavery is to 
be the ultimate civilization of Africa" — 
Nature's laws are indestructible. The 
Creator first made the inanimate world — 
then the vegetable kingdom — then the ser- 
pent tribe ; — out of them came the fish, then 
the fowls of the air, then the brute creation ; 
but his master-piece was man ! He divided 
the world into two climates, and peopled it 
with his children. I believe with Agassiz 
that the world was peopled by nations, not 
in pairs. As there were degrees in veget- 
able, animal and mineral kingdoms, so he 
instituted degrees in the human race. — 
Naturalists point out our ancient stepping- 
stones — the monkey — the ape — the baboon 
— cutting oft the tail of the gorilla in order 
to make the Australian — (laughter) — the 
lowest type of man — then the African— the 
Malayan — the Mongolian — the Caucasian — 
making up that noble specimen of civiliza- 
tion, the Englishman — (" hear," and ap- 
plause) — finishing off with the progressive 
type of man — who combines the virtues of 
the past, and endeavors to avoid its vices — 
the American! (Cheers and laughter.) One 
gentleman asks if the separation of families 
at the slave auction, and the sale of your 
own flesh and blood, is an instance of civil- 
ization ? Certainly not. Such is not now 
the case — public opinion has become the 
public law — families are not divided as in 
former times. (" Oh !" and " It is not true !) 
I know that I am right, gentlemen. I saw 
the advertisement for the sale of the negroes 
on Pierce Butler's estate in Georgia — in 
bankruptcy — children were not separated 
from their parents, nor wives from their 
husbands, and, since which, this exception 
has now become the rule. You are not the 
first to speak about selling one's flesh and 
blood — hence, I remind you of the law of 
England, that permits you to seduce the 
poor man's child, but only compels you to 
pay two shillings and sixpence per week for 



its maintenance. (No !) I say it is the law 
of bastardy — (hear, hear) — and if the in- 
human planter does dispose of his own flesh 
and blood, as you have alleged, so long as 
you continue to pay the present prices for 
cotton, he does not sell his own offspring for 
half-a-crown per week. (" Hear," laughter, 
and cheers.) The slavery of your army 
white man is more abject than the Southern 
negro ! — " One is voluntary, the other is 
not.") Exactly, hence the soldier who 
would desert is as much a slave as the negro 
— I believe there are as many slaves who 
would not accept freedom as soldiers. The 
slaves cling to their masters from affection; 
while the soldier or the operative remains 
solely for his food and raiment — what do 
they care about their officers and employers, 
or even sovereign, beyoud the protection or 
support which, directly or indirectly, they 
afford them ? The law obliges the one to 
place himself in the ranks to be shot down, 
and if he refuses, objects, hesitates — if he 
dares to desert, or show the least insubor- 
dination, he is strung up and put under the 
lash ! The whip is applied oftener on the 
Saxon soldier — if I may judge from your 
newspapers — than on the American slave. 
Augustine called poesy " the wine of de- 
mons." Bacon says, " the mixture of a lie 
doth ever add pleasure." What often ap- 
pears mountains in the distance to the navi- 
gator, proves to be vapor as you approach 
— so the cruelties you picture to the Ameri- 
can slave are simply the offspring of a 
willing fancy. "It is ignorance and not 
knowledge that rejects instruction ; it is 
weakness, not strength, that refuses co- 
operation "—so is it envy and not generosity 
that stimulates abuse; jealousy against the 
white man, not affection for the African, 
that characterizes your abolition sentiments 
— envy keepeth no holidays. You would give 
me strength of memory which I cannot 
claim, and the powers of debate which I do 
not possess, were you to expect me to answer 
all the sallies aimed at me during a five- 
night debate, but I will show you the ab- 
surdity of one or two similies advanced. 

Mr. Edwards pictured a poor girl in her 
dirty home in a dirty village, brought to 
London by some noble lord — educated, 
dressed in silks and satins — the price of 
which was her loss of virtue, as illustrative 
of the negro free in Africa, and a slave in 
America. All this is beautiful in theory, 
but its non application will be seen by my 
asking a question. Might she not have lost 
her virtue in the dirty home he pictured — 
(hear, cheers, and laughter) — without the 
collateral advantages of education, &c, 
which he portrayed ? for it is not notorious 
that the negro had lost his freedom in 
Africa for centuries ? Negro enslaved ne- 
gro before the white man entered the field ; 



train's speeches on slavery and emancipation - . 



and you will find upon the records of time 
that 'Africa holds all the patents for the 
original institution. (Hear, hear.) He 
asked also if the education of the Jew boy, 

Montn.ni. was a justification for the crime of 
kidnapping. Now, Mr. Chairman, 1 ask of 
you if the education of the Jews and prosti- 
tution — however able Mr. Edwards maybe 
to discuss these points — have anything to 
do with American slavery? (Hear, hear.) 
I answer them by relating a negro conver- 
sation under a hen-roost. "Pompey! don't 
you tink dat it am wrong to steal chicken 
belongin' to odder people?" "Csesar! dat 
am a great moral question, dat you or I hab 
not de time nor de brain to lucidate. Pass 
down another pullet." (Cheers, and loud 
and continued laughter.) I have read all 
the authors quoted and more — Lord Mun- 
caster, Grosvenor Smith, Major Gray, Cap- 
taiu Morseby, Major Denham, Clapperton, 
Commodore Owen, Mr. Ashmun, Laird, 
Eankin, Colonel Nicholls, Mr. Oldfield, 
Captain Cook, Canot, and Dr. Livingston, 
and others, all of whom described the 
wretched state of the African, and the low 
state of civilization there, proving beyond 
dispute that there is a much wider field for 
Lord Shaftesbury, Lord Brougham, Exeter 
Hall, and Mr. Edwards in Africa, than they 
would ever find in America. (Hear, hear.) 
I appreciate Mr. Lee's honest views of abo- 
lition more than I do his argument, that the 
death of a friend of his increased population 
— the man while living opposed his daugh- 
ter's marriage— he was killed, the daughter 
married and had children— hence increase in 
census ! (Hear and laughter.) This would 
hold good were we not aware that in Scot- 
land, ''and some other Christian countries, 
population had enormously increased with- 
out any marriages appearing in the records. 
(Loud laughter, and " That's so.") You 
must admit the African is not as intelligent 
as the Englishman — there are types in man, 
degrees in nature. Y\ r ilberforce, Clarksou, 
Romilly, Chauning, Wayland, Darwin, Phil- 
lips, and even Mr. Lee — (hear, hear)— must 
admit this ; they cannot believe the African 
equal to the Caucassian. Can you make a 
pointer out of a poodle ? Can you get a 
peach out of a crab-apple? Can you grow 
an oak from a pea nut? Can you change a 
carrot into a melon ? Will a donkey pro- 
duce an Arab horse ? Can you bring a 
chicken out of an egg plant? Can you 
make an engle out of a duck? or breed a 
lion out of a pole cat? (Hear, hear.) No", 
gentlemen, but under the Christianizing in- 
fluence of modern science, it is much more 
reasonable that England will introduce a 
new trade of manufacturing silk purses out 
of sows' ears. The Roman Novelist Petro- 
nius, in Nero's time, described two literary 
men, who wished to hide a robbery they had 



committed on board a Levantine ship, by 
covering themselves with ink, in order to 
pass as Ethiopians, and thus escape ili'tec- 
tion : — if color alone could transform our 
shape, said Griton, it would be easy — arti- 
ficial color besmears the body — but can we 
fill our lips with an ugly swelling? Crisp 
our hair with an iron ? Mark our forehead 
with scars? distort our shanks into a curve? 
and draw our heels down to the earth ? We 
must do all these things or the lie will not 
succeed. (Hear, hear.) But the hand of 
time points towards the midnight hour, and 
I must hurry on to my plan of abolition— so 
emancipation must be gradual. (Applause.) 
Of the fifty millions now in Africa, some 
forty millions are still slaves. It was no 
unusual thing in former days to see the pens 
where the war prisoners were stored to fat- 
ten preparatory to being eaten. They were 
stall-fed for the market, and hung up and 
cut up as you would sell a sheep or an ox. 
Young girls were considered the greatest 
delicacies, but when tough with age they 
became beasts of burden. Guilty of all 
crimes, accustomed to the lowest acts of 
barbarians, always at war, strangers to 
education, civilization, and Christianity — 
brutalized by the lowest depravity — the 
question arises, no matter what the motive, 
has not his removal to America bettered his 
condition, improved his morals, elevated his 
mind? (Cheers.) Has not that been the 
first step towards regeneration ? There can 
be but one response ; and I have already 
proved my case that American slavery lo the 
negro is a stepping-stone from African 
Barbarism to Christian Civilization ! 
(Cheers.) In conclusion, you are impatient 
for me to prove myself an abolitionist. 
(Yes ! and time!) I shall not do it by hav- 
ing a servile war — or as you did it in the 
West Indies — to quote the Times : " You 
not only emancipated every negro in the West 
Indies, but pretty nearly ruined every plan- 
ter to hoot." Cochrane went too fast in his 
New York speech when recommending the 
arming of the slaves — and Cameron was 
mistaken in dwindling down the glory of our 
nation to an abolition war — and that dis- 
tinguished statesman, who never held an 
office, — that presidential politician, who 
never made a speech — and that great gen- 
eral who never fought a battle — Fremont, 
— came within an ace of running the ship 
upon the rocks in the breakers at St. Louis, 
by pledging the Cabinet to a servile war. 
(" Hear, hear," aud applause.) Robespierre 
and Brisso, in 1791, tried the equalizing 
principle in St. Dimingo— and Alison has 
vividly painted the massacre, speaking of 
the Haytian drama, " That negroes," said 
he, "marched ivith spiked infants on their 
spears, instead of colors ; they sawed asunder 
the male prisoners, and violated the females 



28 



TRAIN'S SPEECHES ON SLAVERY AND EMANCIPATION. 



on the dead bodies of (heir husbands. The 
Cameron-Fremont policy would have pro- 
duced similar anarchy on the Palmetto 
plantations, had it not been summarily 
checked by the strong arm of Lincoln, and 
the wise policy of the Secretary of State— 
and I cannot better express my sentiments 
on this question than by using the very 
words of Earl Russell three nights ago in 
the House of Lords — I am — (said the noble 
'• Earl in reply to Strathden) — sure that we 
"are all anxious that the sin and stain of 
" slavery should cease ; but there is nothing 
" that we should look at with greater alarm 
" than an insurrection of four million of peo- 
ple — the devastations, the horrors, the 
" pillage, the murders, which in the name of 
'• liberty would be committed ! "We trust, 
" when the present contest shall end, the 
"emancipation of the negroes will be 
"brought about by peaceable means without 
" the loss of life or destruction of the pro- 
" perty of their masters. (Cheers.) It is 
" not owing to their masters that slavery now 
"exists in the Southern States ; it is an 
" inheritance which they derived from this 
"country." (Hear, hear.) Such sentiments 
are worthy of this great statesman, who 
assisted by Argyle, and Gladstone, and 
(Gibson — in carrying out the wishes of his 
Queen in checking Lord Palmerston from, 
plunging England into an uncivilized and 
unchristian war with America. (Cheers, 
and " Where is your plan of emancipation ?") 
You shall have it, gentlemen, so plainly that 
you cannot misunderstand it. — If you wish 
to reclaim the swampy morass, cut off the 
fountain that supplies it.-- 1 classify my 
plan under four heads. 

First — Abolish the African slave trade. 
We have done evil that good may come. 
Gordon is no more — the President has had 
the nerve in showing his honesty in suppress- 
ing that traffic, by baring his breast against 
powerful combinations, and hanging the 
first slaver ever executed under the laws of 
piracy. (Hear and applause.) Second — 
Having stopped the stream, we must drain 
the swamp, and fence in the pool — don't 
allow another foot of slave territory under 
the Union — draw a line of fire around the 
scorpion, by strong laws, so that he may 
burn to death if he attempts to cross it — 
these points cut off its supplies and fence it 
in. (Hear, hear.) Thirdly — Under this 
head I propose to emancipate the white 
people first, the Oligarchy must be destroy- 
ed. Now the Oligarchists are passing away 
with every victory. (Applause.) The only 
way to destroy this Oligarchy, and emanci- 
pate the millions of white people it has kept 
in check, is to cut off the political power of 
slavery. (Cheers, and that's good.) Five 
negroes must no longer give three votes to 
the planter, in order to give him a position 



in the councils of the nation, to hatch a plot 
for its destruction. (Not Constitutional.) 
Liberty was the acorn, and the Constitution 
was the flower pot in which it was planted 
— the sapling has out-grown its boundary — 
and the Constitution can easily be amended, 
so as to give the tree wider limits, now it 
has arrived to manhood. (Cheers.) The 
Seceding States have already lost their 
charters through their treason, and as ter- 
ritories might "again be admitted as States 
under an amended Constitution. (Hear, 
hear.) I now come to the fourth point — 
having dammed off the streams, drained the 
land, emancipated the white people, the 
morass already begins to be a garden for 
the African. "Now let us emancipate him. 
(Cheers.) Let the States pass a law under 
the guidance of the Constitution, compelling 
the planter, as a slight tax upon his treason, 
to give the slave his own labor one day in 
the week, to work out his own freedom — his 
price fixed at a fair value, and arranged 
under guarantees that the slave shall have 
that' day as wall as over hours to purchase 
his liberty — this knowledge stimulates ambi 
tion, gives him self-reliance, so that when he 
has earned his freedom, he is also educated 
to appreciate it. (Cheers.) The world will 
have before them a plan— public opinion 
will so act upon the planter that many will 
emancipate such slaves as can take care of 
themselves at once, the strong and active 
negroes should be made to work out the 
freedom of their parents and children where 
they are unable to do it themselves. This 
would strengthen the social ties, and, before 
a generation passed over, all the slaves may 
have educated themselves for freedom — the 
loss of the slave's labor to the planter for 
that day may raise the value of the cotton, 
so that the consumer pay a portion of the 
bill, and abolition England by purchasing 
that cotton will have earned the credit she 
has worked for so long, of bettering the 
condition of the negro slave. (Cheers and 
applause.) The swamp, gentlemen, will 
soon be fertilized by the enterprising Yan- 
kees, who will pour down to guide the 
negroes in their labor, and by superior 
industry make the Southern desert blossom 
like the Northern rose. (Applause.) And 
the Southern Cross will receive by this 
means its fairly-earned Northern Crown. 
(Cheers.) Delaware and the District of Co- 
lumbia should emancipate their six thousand 
slaves on next Fourth of July — (cheers) — 
Missouri and Maryland follow suit on the 
next Anniversary of Washington — (cheers) 
Virginia and Kentucky must keep pace 
with public opinion, in order to join all the 
slave States in the great celebration of 
I Eighteen-seventy-six, of General Emanci- 
pation on the First Centenary of our 
| Glorious Union. (Loud cheers.) 



train's speeches on slavery and emancipation. 29 



Iii reply to one honorable speaker, who 
asked, if the slaves were set free at once, if 
they would not organize a system of their 
own— 1 thought that I had before proved 
that the African will not work without a 
master. The European combines and suc- 
ceeds. The Asiatic race, also, understand 
the power in part of working in concert. 
But the African has no idea of a joint-stock 
enterprise. They were always bondsmen — 
but they must not be called slaves. The 
work stinks almost as bad as the negro — 
not quite— for the negro's pores are always 
open ! Enslaving debases, I admit, the 
enslaver — (hear, hear, and '-That's so - ') — 
but. thus far, has elevated the slave. "True." 
and hear.) The Africans never combine. 
Persians. Asiatics, and Tartars have had 
armies, but who ever heard of such a thing 
as an African army, an African regiment, 
an African bank, an African joint-stock 
association of any kind? Be assured the 
negro is a one-horse mind, with a one-story 
intellect. (Laughter.) Under guidance, 
they will work — alone, they wallow in idle- 
ness. Nature never intended the negro to 
be our master, or even our equal, but our 
servants. Nature's plans are simple ; her 
results are sublime. Every infant born is 
another link in Nature's chain. Progres- 
sion is her first law. The sun comes on, 
and leaves us at the horizon, but is always 
moving. Little things make great things. 
Day breaks by degrees, and night comes on 
under a regular law. Barbarism always 
precedes civilization — (cheers) — mythology 
comes before theology — superstition before 
religion — ideal before the real — natural 
before spiritual. The superior follows the 
inferior throughout history; so freedom 
must succeed slavery. (Loud cheers.) Asso- 
ciation succeeds progression, and develop- 
ment follows association. Creation is a 
study. Man is linked with everything in 
the animal, mineral, and vegetable world. 
The grain of corn is planted in the spring — 
it progresses, it associates, it developes. 
Man eats it in the morning — at night it 
becomes part of the blood, the flesh, and 
the bone, and the next day a portion of the 
brain — perchance a human thought working- 
out some patent reaping machine. (Loud 
applause.) The world is worked on a won- 
derful system. The Creator made the negro 
as well as his master, and in making him he 
gave him bodily strength to make up for his 
mental weakness. (Hear.) The old kings 
and patriarchs of the Bible were bad men. 
In our day such crimes would have sent them 
to the gallows. (Laughter, and " Question.") 
Who questions it? (Renewed laughter.) 
Madame Tussaud would have had them all 
in the Chamber of Horrors. (Applause.) 
Their bondsmen did not fare so well as our 
slaves. Good comes out of evil. Astrology 



prepared the road for astronomy — alchemy 
preceded chemistry — soothsaying foresha- 
dowed prophecy — and priestly traditions 
came before the wonderful realities of 
modern science. What then prevents Ameri- 
can slavery from showing the door to general 
emancipation? (Cheers.) Where there is 
now land all was once water — and where 
there is now water all will sometime become 
land. Time is the leveler. Time will emanci- 
pate the negro. (Cheers.) The Almighty's 
ways are all his own. Corn and flowers 
may yet grow abundantly in the African 
desert. The gospel of Jesus will yet Chris- 
tianize the heathen. Perhaps as it is doing 
through American slavery. (Hear.) The 
lion and the lamb some day will lie down 
together. Electricity will perhaps conduct 
the locomotive at two hundred miles the 
hour, as easily as it now sends messages as 
many thousands at a flash. Some invention 
will yet be made for this mysterious agency. 
Lightning may yet conduct away all disease 
from the home of man. The air itself may 
be controled with as much facility as the 
navigator sails his ship upon the waters. 
Time is the greatest inventor, and having 
convinced you— (No)-that American slavery 
was one stepping-stone, it may turn out that 
the American civil war will become another, 
perhaps the great and last stepping-stone 
which will bring universal freedom to the 
slave. (Loud Cheers.) 

Will you give me two minutes more ? — 
(hear, hear, and yes)— it is only to ask Eng- 
land to assist me in carrying out my plan- 
charity begins at home, and I want to get 
the Victor" Hugos, the Sutherlands, and the 
clever George Thompsons, and JohnBrights, 
of abolition, to get England to pass the fol- 
lowing resolutions : 

Resolved, That from this day we will not 
wear a slave-grown cotton shirt — sleep be- 
tween slave-grown cotton sheets — (hear) — 
wipe our faces with slave-grown cotton 
towels — use slave-grown cotton clothes on 
our children — or slave-grown cotton hand^ 
kerchiefs ; that we will not wear a particle 
of clothing— walk on a single carpet— or 
have anything to do with any article that 
requires a particle of slave-grown cotton in 
its texture. (Cheers.) 

Resolved., That we and our men-servants, 
nor our maid-servants will not drink another 
drop of slave-grown coffee, or put another 
lump of slave-grown sugar in our tea.— 
(Cheers.) 

Resolved, That we will eat no slave-grown 
rice, or corn, or grain. (Applause.) 

Resolved, That we will never smoke an- 
other slave-grown cigar — take another pinch 
of slave-grown snuff— (laughter,) —or use 
another pipeful of slave-grown tobacco in 
the " Forum ;" (cheers, and bad for Comber,) 



30 train's great speech on the pardoning of traitors. 



— that the five and a half-millions sterling 
revenue received for these articles be abol- 
ished by prohibiting them altogether. — 
(Cheers and applause.) 

This will be consistency — I asked it for 
my cause — for you cannot be consistent and 
pay a direct premium in slavery, by buying 
at high prices the product of the slave. 
(Hear, hear, and that's so.) My argument 
is closed. I thank you, gentlemen, for your 
courtesy and your attention, and ask you if 
I have not gone further than you have done 
in my abolitionism? (Hear, hear.) If not, 
I will conclude by saying, once for all, that 
I would do away with the Christian mode of 
civilizing the heathen (loud cheers) ; and that 
you may thoroughly appreciate how much of 
a reformer I am, I may mention that I would 



go further — I would also do away with the 
rumshops — close the opium-dens — I would 
abolish courts and prisons — I would have no 
bastards — no paupers — no Cyprians — no 
drunkards — I would do away with dice-box 
and cards — with envy, hatred, jealousy, slan- 
der, and all uncharitableness — I would seek 
to improve mankind by sweeping away vice 
and crime, and substituting virtue and hap- 
piness ; and most assuredly I would do away 
with this accursed plan that England has 
introduced into our country of elevating the 
black-man by a system which has debased 
the white race, until it finally culminated in 
the most damning treason (loud cheers) ever 
recorded on the archives of time against the 
grandest Republic humanity has ever wit- 
nessed ! (Loud and continued cheering.) 



GEORGE FRANCIS TRAIN ON "PARDONING TRAITORS." 

"WOULD CIVILIZATION BE ADVANCED BY THE SOUTH 
GAINING THEIR INDEPENDENCE?" 



[From the London American of March 12, 18G2.] 

" "Would civilization be advanced by th 
South gaining their Independence?" was 
the question discussed on Monday evening, 
March 10th, where Dr. Johnson once held 
forth: — "Sir," said he to Boswell, "let us 
take a walk down Fleet street." 



Mr. Train: — Nine speakers have already 
spoken for the North, and none for the 
South. Whence this change ? A few 
weeks ago. and you were all Secession ; 
now, everybody is for the Union. (Hear.) 
As no one has touched upon the question in 
the paper, why should I ? All you can ex- 
pect is, that I should talk America, and 
wander from point to point as others have 
done — (laughter) — but I hail this change of 
tone as a happy omen. (Hear.) If a few 
salaried writers form public opinion in the 
Times — making England despise America — 
why should not the clever debaters that fre- 
quent this hall be allowed to represent the 
masses of your nation? (Hear, hear.) 

ENGLAND HAS TURNED ENTIRE- 
LY ROUND. 

England has turned completely round — 
the Trent has drawn all her fire — Mason 
drops down here like a spent shell — and 
our lands are bound to be more friendly 
than ever. (Hear.) I speak the voice of 
our people, when I tell you that none of us, 
disgusted as we may have been at your 
neutrality — (laughter) — eudorse the strange 
speech of Lovejoy. (Cheers.) A pupil of 



the Shaftesbury school — and remembering 
that his brother was shot over his Abolition 
printing press in Illinois — you will not blame 
even him for feeling annoyed to see England's 
apparent forgetfulness of slavery, in sympa- 
thizing with the slave oligarchy that sought 
the ruin of our empire. (Hear.) 



RISE AND DECLINE OF SECESSION 
IN ENGLAND. 

I am glad to see that Secession is dead 
in England ; Russell settled it in his block- 
ade letter — and its rise and progress during 
twelve months is noticeable by Gregory's 
motion last year to acknowledge the Con- 
federacy — and this year vainly trying to put 
a question as to the blockade being effective ! 
— Yancey's advocacy was weak as water ; 
but Mason's letter was water diluted. It 
turns out that the six hundred ships that 
run the blockade were a few fifty ton 
schooners on the inland estuaries, and 
steamboats between Memphis and New 
Orleans! (" Oh," and " question.") Civi- 
lization was the point, and as every speaker 
has dodged it, you, of course, expect me to 
take it up. Well, then, the South does not 
possess the elements of civilization. (Oh.) 

THE SOUTH UNABLE TO STAND 
ALONE. 

If they cannot get on with the North — 
what can they do alone? They want a 
standing army and free trade ! — that is a 
paradox. They want an oligarchy and im- 
migration — that is a contradiction — for emi- 



train's great speech on the pardoning of traitors. 31 



grants will not go where they have no 
representation. (Hear.) They want open 
ports and manufactures — that is also an- 
other impossibility. Even let them carry 
out their plans, and the Government is at a 
dead lock, for revenue— an export duty on 
cotton is an import duty in another form. 
(That's so.) 

IT IS WITHOUT THE ELEMENTS 
OF CIVILIZATION. 

Besides, as I said, the South has not the 
elements of civilization. (Oh — and hear.) 
Where are they then? Let the gentleman 
who interrupts me take all the advantage of 
his interruption and answer me if he can. 
(Hear, hear.) Is it in jurisprudence? 
Where are their Storys — their Kents — their 
Wheatons — their Parsons and their Bige- 
lows ? (Hear.) Is it in Finance ? Where 
are their Bateses — their Peabodys— their 
Browns and their Sturgesses ? Is it in 
Commerce? Where are their Goodhues — 
their Taylors — their Forbeses — their Apple- 
tons and their Grinnels. (Cheers.) Is it 
in shipbuilding ? Where do you find their 
Webbs — their Mackays, and their Wester- 
velts. Is it sculpture ? Where are their 
Greenoughs — their Hosmers — and their 
Powers. (Applause.) Is it in painting? 
Where are their Alstons— their Stuarts, and 
their Benjamin Wests ? (Cheers.) Is it in 
man ufactures? There are no Manchesters, 
and Walthams, and Lowells, and Lawrences 
in the South. (Hear, hear.) Is it in his- 
tory? Where are their Bancrofts — their 
Prescott — their Sparks, and their Mot- 
leys? I can see nowhere in Secessia the 
elements civilization requires. Is it in ro- 
mance? Where are their Washington Ir- 
vings — (Cheers.) — their Fennimore Coopers, 
and their Hawthornes? Is it in poetry ? 
Show me where to find their Holmes — their 
Willises — their Lowells and their Longi'el- 
lows— (Cheers.) — Is it in Inventions ? Who 
filled the Exhibition of Fifty-one with im- 
provements that still live in England ? 
(Hear and applause.) Where did McCor- 
mick hail from? where Colt? whence came 
the Enfield Rifle ?— Was Ilobbs a South- 
erner ? and who furnished the Secession 
Times and Telegraph and three-fourths the 
Journals in London with presses to abuse 
America during the Reign of Secessia, 
but our Northern Colonel Hoe. (Cheers.) 
Where was the Niagara built? and was 
the Yacht America a Southern Institution? 
(Hear, hear.) No — gentlemen — these are 
some of the elements of our Yankee civili- 
zation — peculiar to our Yankee climate, 
and Yankee habits not yet appreciated in 
Secessia. (Cheers.) Is the common school 
system of New England an element of 
Southern civilization ? The South alone 
benefit civilization ! — Why, Mr. Chairman, I 



have proved its absurdity. Bearing in mind 
the debate on previous evenings, I will 
answer one or two Secession fallacies. The 
gentleman from Australia says that no black 
man in the North would be allowed to enter 
a room like this for public discussion, and 
this in face of the fact that there are two 
negroes admitted at the bar in Boston, and 
have practised there for several years. 

WE DO NOT WANT CANADA. 

He also spoke of America's intentions re- 
garding Canada. — America wants nothing 
from Canada. — The two lauds are as differ- 
ent as the two people — one is day — the 
other night. (Laughter and hear.) One 
is going to a funeral — the other a wedding. 
One is the old world without any progress 
by assenting with the new. In Canada they 
can't even make a barrel. (Laughter.) — • 
The only great thing accomplished there is 
about the grandest swindle of this, the nine- 
teenth century, the Grand Trunk Railway. 
(Oh, and hear.) Another spoke of unjust 
representation, citing Rhode Island — Con- 
necticut — Vermont, and New Hampshire, 
with a small population having so many 
electoral votes ; and yet he omitted to men- 
tion that Arkansas — Texas — Florida pur- 
chased of Spain — Louisiana bought of 
France — and Texas of the Mexicans — have 
equal representation in the Senate of the 
United States. (Hear.) Original Secessia 
entire with its six hundred thousand square 
miles of country, has but two millions seven 
hundred thousand white people — while New 
York, with but forty-seven thousand square 
miles, has a population of three millions 
eight hundred thousand, and Pennsylvania, 
forty-six thousand square miles, has a popu- 
lation of two millions nine hundred thou- 
sand. (Applause.) These two States alone 
have more population than the Two Seces- 
sias, and ten times the wealth. (Cheers.) — 
Little Massachusetts has a bank capital of 
fifteen millions sterling, while all Secessia 
boasts of but thirteen millions ! (Applause.) 

THE REBELLION A GIGANTIC 
HUMBUG. 

I tell you the Rebellion is a gigantic hum- 
bug— (laughter)— a gigantic sham ! — where 
are their successes? (Bull Rim, Ball's 
Bluff— question, and laughter.) Must I 
again tell you that the nation was sold 
at Manassas, by treachery, as General 
Stone sold his country" at Ball's Bluff? 
(Shame.) But are we alone in reverses? 
Look at England ! at Peiho ! at Cawnpore ! 
at Cabul aud at the Redan ! (Hear.) Look 
at Russia in Circassia — France in Algeria- 
Austria in Italy, and now the Spaniards in 
Mexico ! Surely we are not alone— The 
Pretender with two thousand Scots frighten- 
ed all England a century ago! Our seven 
hundred thousand soldiers only allow— so 



32 train's great speech on the pardoning of traitors. 



gigantic is our territory — but one man to 
every mile and a half of border. 

AMERICA MERELY HAS THE 
VARIOLOID. 

Lamartine eloquently observes — every 
Revolution has its birth — every birth its 
pang — every pang its groan ! All nations 
have their diseases. — We are just going 
through the varioloid — (laughter) — having 
passed the scarlet fever, measles,, and chic- 
ken-pox on the heights of Abraham — 
(laughter)— and the plains of Saratoga. — 
(Cheers.) Our tree of liberty is sound at 
the core. — We are only shaking off the cat- 
terpillars that have so long disfigured its 
branches. (Hear, and applause] 

WASHINGTON AND CROMWELL 
VOLUNTEERS. 
I am tired of listening to England's sneers 
about our volunteers. You seem proud of 
your hundred and fifty thousand men — 
(cheers) — let us take the same ratio of glory 
for our volunteer millions. (Laughter and 
applause.) Sneer not at the volunteers — 
Washington was a volunteer — so was Robert 
Clive at the battle of Plassey — and Oliver 
Cromwell was not educated at the Horse 
Guards. (Laughter.) The two-spot is too 
muck for the ace of clubs if it happens to be 
a trump. 

SEPARATION NOT NECESSARY. 

One speaker thinks that civilization would 
follow separation, on the ground that States 
become too large to be prosperous. Hence 
he agrees with Bulwer in breaking America 
into parts. England, to say the least, has 
never followed that plan.. (Hear.) She went 
to India in Elizabeth's time, and put Prince 
against Prince, until she was enabled to 
absorb the entire empire of two hundred 
millions. (Cheers.) Had she gone on your 
theory — India would be off the reel long ago 
—and Australia — and Canada — and Ireland ! 
— Again, what a spectacle of weakness the 
petty Principalities of Germany — Central 
and South America present — compared to 
the consolidated strength of seventy millions 
in Russia — and forty millions iu France — or 
even England herself, with an empire on all 
the oceans ! (Cheers.) 

REBELLION, FIRST PALSIED, 
NOW DEAD. 

No, Mr. Chairman, the revolution is dead 
It received its first attack of paralysis — 
when Congress voted five hundred thousand 
men — and five hundred millions of dollars ! 



(Cheers.) It experienced its second attack 
when, after the Trent affair, England and 
France refused to acknowledge their inde- 
pendence. (Applause.) And now comes 
apoplexy and death, when the Commander- 
in-Chief of the Army and Navy sounded the 
bugle and gave his order to his Lieutenant — 
Charge, McClellan, charge ! — On to Ma- 
nassas, on ! — were not the last words of 
our Presidential Marmion ! (Cheers.) The 
world will shortly see how gigantic has been 
the success of the North — (Oh, and where) 
— and how gigantic the failure of the South ! 
Secessia was a sham at the start, and > has 
been a sham all through the revolution. 
(Oh, and interruption.) 

AMERICA CAN AFFORD A GIGAN- 
TIC PARDON. 

Now, as America goes to war in a gigan- 
tic way, I am prepared to show for once in 
our great strength — gigantic clemency! 
(hear) — and suggest that as we have killed 
Secessia that we still keep our originality in 
doing things differently from Europe — by 
giving our erring fellow-citizens — a gigantic 
pardon ! (Loud cheers.) England sends 
her rebels to Tasmania — France to Cayenne 
— and Russia to Siberia — but let America 
follow out the good work she has begun in 
liberating all the State prisoners in Fort 
Lafayette — Fort McHenry, and Fort War- 
ren — and pardon all the traitors, without 
any security for the future but the sentiment 
of Union. (Cheers.) Hanging is really too 
good for them. (Laughter.) They ought 
to be compelled to live among those they 
have deceived, and obliged to associate with 
their own kindred. (Laughter) — No more 
terrible punishment could assail them. — If 
a man has a fault, trust his own family to 
find it out. (Laughter.) Let one sister go 
astray, and there is no more happiness for 
her in her father's household. — Let one boy 
at school have a patch on his breeches, and 
every boy will chalk the place, (Laughter.) 
Pass through a village and they will tell you 
where the Gambler lives — where the Cyprian 
receives her guests — where the murder was 
committed — all these haunted spots are 
pointed out "with scorn to be shunned by 
honest men. (Hear.) So let the President 
pardon all the traitors and compel them to 
reside in their own localities among the 
Union men they have been kept under by 
the strong arm of powder and ball, and jus- 
tice will soon find its proper measure in tar 
and feathers ! (Laughter and question.) 



THE END. 



©6"^ 



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60 


Old Curiosity Shop, - 


.50 


60 


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no 


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Ml 


I-ittle Do' .-it. 


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AD 


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!■<• 


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511 


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.'.(1 


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.111 


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,',il 



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] 00 
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1 00 

1 00 
1 00 
1 00 



so 



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of London, 2 vols., - 
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1 no 
1 00 
1 oo 
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Kenneth, 

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Parricide, » 

Life in Paris, 
Countess and the Page, 
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1 mi 
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Ten Thousand a Year, 
2 vols., paper, - 



50 
50 
50 

I 00 



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ALEXANDER DUMAS' WORKS. 



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Countess of Charny, - 1 00 

The Iron Mask, - - 1 00 



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Edmond Dantes, - - 50 
George, ... 50 



Felina de Chambure, - 
Genevieve, - 



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Isabel of Bavaria, - 50 

Mohicans of Paris, - 50 
Man with Five Wives, 



The Horrors of Paris, - 60 Twin Lieutenants, - 50 

MISS PARDOE'S WORKS. 

The Jealous Wife, - 50 I The Wife's Trials, - 50 

Confessions of a Pretty Rival Beauties, - - 50 

Woman, - - . 50 | Romance of the Harem, M) 

The five above books are also bound In one vol., for £2 .50. 

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MRS. SOUTHWORTH'S WORKS. 



Deserted Wife. - 
The Gipsy's Prophecy 
The Mother-in- Law, . 
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The Lost Heiress, 
Lady 0'' the Isle, 
The Two sisters. 
The Three Beauties, ■ 
Viviai S'cret Power, • 
India. Pearl River, ■ 
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The above are each 
book is also published 
Hickory Hall, • 



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1 00 Retribution. 

1 00 Curse of Clifton, 

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• 1 00 mony, - 
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Pilot of Belle Creole, 1 00 

Robert Graham, - 1 00 

Courtship & Marriage, 1 00 

The above are each In two 



Rena : or the Suowbird, I 00 
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Love after Marriage, - 1 00 



Eoli 

The Bai Ished Son, 
Helen and Arthur, 
Planter's Daughter, 

iliimca. papei 



- 1 00 

- 1 00 

- 1 00 

- 1 00 
Each 



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FREDRIK* BREMER'S WORKS. 

Father and Daughter, - 100 I The Neighbors,- - 100 

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MRS. ANN S. STEPHENS* WORKS. 

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